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Frequently Asked Questions about Eye on Books

Last updated Jan 15, 2011

  1. Why haven’t you interviewed my favorite author?
  2. Can you tell me how to contact an author?
  3. I can’t find the author’s address. Can you pass along a message to him/her for me?
  4. Can I get a transcript of an Eye on Books interview?
  5. I’m an author (or I represent one). Can I arrange an interview with Bill Thompson?
  6. Can I embed an Eye on Books interview on my blog or website?
  7. Can I use one of your interviews — or an excerpt from one — in my podcast?
  8. I have a radio show. Can I use Eye on Books interviews on the air?
  9. How about your author photos? Can I use one in my blog / research paper / presentation?
  1. Why haven’t you interviewed my favorite author? There can be many reasons. A few authors are never available for interviews, others only infrequently. Also, since most Eye on Books interviews are done in-person, a particular author may not be here if their only interview availability is by telephone.
  2. Can you tell me how to contact an author? We don’t have access to authors’ personal email or snail-mail addresses. You should first check to see if the author has a website since there is usually contact information there. If not, authors can typically be reached by sending a letter to their publisher.
  3. I can’t find the author’s address. Can you pass along a message to him for me? Sorry, no. As stated above, we don’t have any contact information that’s not publicly available.
  4. Can I get a transcript of an Eye on Books interview? Creating transcripts is very labor intensive, and that’s why we don’t routinely offer them – yet. As they say, “watch this space”!
  5. I’m an author (or I represent one). Can I arrange an interview with Bill Thompson? We’d be glad to consider it! Just go to our Contact page. Please note: Eye on Books does not interview the authors of self-published books.
  6. Can I embed an Eye on Books interview on my blog or website? Yes! We’d be delighted if you did. Easy cut-and-paste embedding code (like what you see on video-sharing sites) will very soon be available for all of our interviews.
  7. Can I use one of your interviews — or an excerpt from one — in my podcast? In most cases, yes. All we ask is that you give us a proper credit, both in the podcast itself and, if applicable, in your show notes. Don’t alter the sound file to make it appear that you did the interview. That’s not cool.
  8. I have a radio show. Can I use Eye on Books interviews on the air? Yes, but read this very carefully first: YOU MAY NOT BROADCAST EYE ON BOOKS INTERVIEWS or excerpts thereof on any radio, TV, or cable station or network in the Washington, DC-Baltimore metropolitan areas. You must give on-air credit to “EyeonBooks.com” and, if also used on your station’s website, a link back to Eye on Books. And while it’s not required, it would be very nice if you would let us know when you’re airing our work.
  9. How about your author photos? Can I use one in my blog / research paper / presentation? In most cases, yes, as long as the photo credit is “Eye on Books.” Many photos or illustrations you see on Eye on Books come from other sources. You’ll need to ask them for permission to use those photos. Contact us for details.

Didn’t see your question here? Write to us.

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One Response

  1. Paul Olofson says:

    Paul Olofson
    Vienna, VA

    Hi Bill,

    I’ve been a fan of WMAL for a long time and enjoy the entire spectrum of shows from local to national and all the information they provide. I would like to submit my book Commie in a Cadillac for review. I emailed John Batchelor (WABC Radio) about it awhile back and he thought enough of my work to have me on his weekend literary show. Below is a short summary of the book. If you have any questions or would like a copy, please contact me using the above information. The word count is 109,000.

    Commie in a Cadillac is a novel about Grant Saginaw, a senator from Virginia, who has decided to call it quits. He’s going to retire from five terms as a congressman and three as a senator. Looking back on his career and all the American people have done for him, he decides a regular retirement party just won’t do. It would be more fitting, for someone of his stature, to have an extended farewell from the American people. Not just a farewell from the state of Virginia, but one from the entire United States. Someone of his stature should get to visit all the states that served him during his career and do it in a style befitting a United States senator. There’s only one way to tour the entire country in private jets, enjoy first class accommodations and have someone else foot the bill for the entire operation. That one way is reserved for the elite class in America and comes up once every four years. The book is about his run for president…as a Democrat…they party harder.

    Fortunately, for skiers, the primary season starts off in New Hampshire…in the winter, so Grant heads there with is aide, Frank Daniels, earlier than the other candidates. While out skiing, Grant meets a couple of local ski bums, and since he’s always looking to improve his skiing, he invites them to join his campaign. The extra time in New Hampshire and his confident showing in the debate allow him to do well in the primary and give his campaign fund the boost they need to keep going.

    The plan starts off well as the campaign racks up frequent flyer miles and hotel reward points to no end. Along the way, they head to Deer Valley, Utah for campaign retreats, to Daytona to take in a NASCAR experience and to New Orleans for some Bourbon Street fun during the Louisiana contest. Then, his ingenious plan goes awry, the vote starts to split between the best of the five traditional Party‑line candidates and his campaign.

    Another candidate catches on to his scheme and she threatens to throw her support behind his campaign, his worst nightmare, if he doesn’t submit to a night of bliss. He doesn’t have any options and gives in to her deceit. The next day, she endorses his campaign.

    As the campaign progresses, they continue to improve their message and sway voters to the opposition. The modifications, combined with their rival’s large early lead, prove successful, and they lose their bid for the nomination.

    In the middle of their victory celebration, an avid supporter turns up and informs Grant that she is still trying to help him win the nomination. Hours later, the campaign manager for the actual nominee stops by. He looks haggard, lethargic and can barely speak.

    Sincerely,

    Paul Olofson

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