Paul Theroux “The Last Train to Zona Verde”

June 17th, 2013

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Paul  TherouxTheroux

One of the greatest travel writers of our time is bidding a farewell to the land that gave him his inspiration.

With his new book “The Last Train to Zona Verde,” Paul Theroux had planned to complement his 2003 bestseller “Dark Star Safari,” in which he traversed eastern Africa from Cairo to Cape Town. His plan this time was to start in Cape Town and work his way north, through western Africa, with a potential end point of Timbuktu. But once he was out of South Africa, past Namibia, and into Angola, Theroux began to rethink his plan.

Theroux encounters a world increasingly removed from both the itineraries of tourists and the hopes of postcolonial independence movements.

The heat and poverty, roadblocks, mobs, and anarchy take their toll, and after 2,500 arduous miles, Theroux comes to the end of his journey in more ways than one.

His new book is called “The Last Train to Zona Verde.”

Continue to the interview > > >

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Alexandra Fuller “Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness”

September 22nd, 2011

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A decade ago Alexandra Fuller‘s memoir “Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight,” her story of growing up in Africa, established her as a vital new voice. But her mother hated it. Called it “that awful book.”

Alexandra  Fuller

She’s more enthusiastic about Fuller’s new book, “Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness.” It is her parents’ story, described by her publisher as “a story of survival and madness, love and war, loyalty and forgiveness.” And in a way this is a book Alexandra Fuller could only write after undergoing a metamorphosis aided by her book editor….

Alexandra  FullerFuller

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Ross Donaldson “The Lassa Ward”

June 12th, 2009

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When second-year medical student Ross Donaldson went to west Africa in 2003, it was to study the rare Lassa virus, a viral hemorrhagic fever and a cousin of the feared Ebola virus.

Ross  DonaldsonDonaldson

In Sierra Leone Donaldson connected with Dr. Aniru Conteh, whose Lassa ward had treated thousands of patients. But public health in the Third World is a whole different kind of medicine, as Donaldson found out when tested by fire. He describes that unforgettable summer in his book “The Lassa Ward.”

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Tracy Kidder “Strength in What Remains”

January 16th, 2009

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A young medical student from the horrifyingly war-ravaged African nation of Burundi arrives in New York City in the mid 1990s, to find a unique kind of culture shock, in Tracy Kidder‘s new book “Strength in What Remains.”

Tracy  Kidder

The man’s called simply “Deo” in Kidder’s book, coming to the big city with a few dollars in his pocket, almost no knowledge of English, and a preference for sleeping in Central Park instead of a rundown tenement. But Deo’s story will amaze you, when he meets the right people…

Tracy  KidderKidder

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Isaac Benatar “The Four Faces”

September 11th, 2006

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Isaac  BenatarBenatar

A man is thrown into a maelstrom of multiple murders, and the powerful magic of African witch doctors, in the new novel by Isaac Benatar called “The Four Faces.” Benatar was born in Zimbabwe and was a public prosecutor in Rhodesia for ten years before immigrating to the United States.

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