Rod Gragg “The Illustrated Gettysburg Reader”

July 3rd, 2013

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It was an audacious effort, and had it succeeded, the outcome of the Civil War could have been completely different.

Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped that the Battle of Gettysburg, in the first week of July, 1863 would turn the tide and propel the South to victory.

One hundred and fifty years after the Battle of Gettysburg, that pivotal event comes alive again in historian Rod Gragg‘s book “The Illustrated Gettsburg Reader.”

Rod  GraggGragg

Gragg has assembled an eyewitness history of the Civil War’s greatest battle.

Continue to the interview > > >

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Tony Horwitz “Midnight Rising”

October 25th, 2011

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Tony  Horwitz

John Brown. Hero? Martyr? Or traitor? Terrorist? Brown’s audacious raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859, with the aim of launching a slave uprising, remains one of the most controversial episodes in American history, and Brown himself one of the most divisive figures.

Tony  HorwitzHorwitz

Yet, think about what most of us learned about it in school, and it’s almost embarrassing how little we know about John Brown and the raid that most agree set the stage for the Civil War.

Now in his book “Midnight Rising” Tony Horwitz takes a fresh new look at Brown, the men and women who helped him, and how the raid really affected our nation’s history.

Listen to Tony Horwitz

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James McBride “Song Yet Sung”

February 12th, 2008

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A runaway slave in pre-Civil War Maryland is caught, imprisoned, then escapes again in James McBride‘s novel “Song Yet Sung.” Liz Spocott has suffered a head injury which gives her the ability to see the future, which, in turn, eventually leaves her to doubt the promise of the underground railroad.

James  McBrideMcBride

We watch, too, as slavery stains everyone it touches, even those who are essentially good people.

Listen to James McBride

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