Rod Gragg “The Illustrated Gettysburg Reader”

July 3rd, 2013

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It was an audacious effort, and had it succeeded, the outcome of the Civil War could have been completely different.

Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped that the Battle of Gettysburg, in the first week of July, 1863 would turn the tide and propel the South to victory.

One hundred and fifty years after the Battle of Gettysburg, that pivotal event comes alive again in historian Rod Gragg‘s book “The Illustrated Gettsburg Reader.”

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Gragg has assembled an eyewitness history of the Civil War’s greatest battle.

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Nathaniel Philbrick “Bunker Hill”

June 6th, 2013

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There comes a moment in every revolution, writes Nathaniel Philbrick, when neutrality is no longer an option.

In the American Revolution, the Battle of Bunker Hill may be that moment.

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Philbrick’s new book “Bunker Hill” puts the storied battle in sharp new relief, to underscore its importance in shaping the war that was just beginning and the new nation that would result.

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And while the book is filled with the “usual suspects” – Paul Revere, John Adams, Sam Adams – Philbrick also introduces us to a man who should be in that same pantheon, Dr. Joseph Warren, who may have done more than any other single patriot to choreographing the revolution.

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Kevin Phillips “1775”

February 1st, 2013

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1776 is such an iconic year in American history that it ends up overshadowing a year that may have been even more significant — 1775, says historian and bestselling author Kevin Phillips.

His book “1775” upends the conventional reading of the American Revolution and punctures the myth that 1776 was the watershed year of the revolution.

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Phillips carefully catalogs the events of 1775 that he says achieved a sweeping Patriot control of territory and local government that Britain was never able to overcome.

By 1776, Phillips writes, it was too late for the British to regain control.

And his publisher says “1775” will revolutionize our understanding of America’s origins.

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Selden Edwards “The Lost Prince”

September 3rd, 2012

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A genuine sequel — one that picks right up where the previous book left off — is actually fairly rare. And Selden Edwards has written one.

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“The Lost Prince” is a followup to his 2008 bestseller “The Little Book,” in which a late 20th century rock musician suddenly, and inexplicably, found himself one day in 19th century Vienna, Austria.

“The Lost Prince” follows Eleanor Burden, who has recently returned to Boston from a momentous trip to Europe. And she has brought with her a journal, filled with often-vague instructions that she is to follow faithfully, for if she does, the reward will be fabulous.

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What’s in that journal? Eleanor believes she has advance knowledge of every major historical event to come during her lifetime.

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Robert Service “Spies and Commissars”

May 17th, 2012

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Robert  Service

Nearly a hundred years after the Bolshevik revolution that deposed Russia’s tsars and put Lenin in control of the nascent Soviet Union, new details are still coming out about how it all came about.

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British historian Robert Service has now dug deep into declassified documents to uncover secrets of the Russian revolution.

His book “Spies and Commissars” opens a new window on the varied personalities behind the revolt — and the westerners who tried everything they could think of to kill the Bolshevik movement in its infancy.

Listen to Robert Service

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