William Hazelgrove “Rocket Man”

April 17th, 2013

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William  Hazelgrove

It’s a new, upside down American Dream that Dale Hammer is struggling with, in William Hazelgrove‘s novel “Rocket Man.”

William  HazelgroveHazelgrove

Dale has moved his family out to the suburbs — big house, big lawn, big car, and big anxiety and big panic…

But Dale is determined to find meaning in the landscape of suburbia, looking for the moment he once had with his own father when they blasted off a rocket one wintry evening, so many years ago. Continue to the interview > > >

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Emily Jeanne Miller “Brand New Human Being”

June 15th, 2012

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Emily Jeanne MillerMiller

Logan Pyle is a young man who’s going through a pretty rough patch. His grad school career is languishing. His father has died. His four-year-old son seems to be regressing to babyhood. Then he catches his wife with another man.

And that’s when Logan’s train goes off the track. He takes the kid and a hastily-packed bag and heads off for .. well, for somewhere to be determined.

Emily Jeanne Miller

Emily Jeanne Miller deftly puts all of this in a first-person voice, in her debut novel “Brand New Human Being.”

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Mark Shriver “A Good Man”

June 11th, 2012

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Mark  ShriverShriver

Few men are as widely praised as Sargent Shriver was. after his death in early 2011. Thousands of tributes hailed Shriver not only for his great public accomplishments — founding the Peace Corps, building President Johnson’s War on Poverty — but also his personal virtues.

Mark  Shriver

He was — in nearly everyone’s words — “a good man.” His son Mark Shriver at first misread those expressions as simply the kind of thing you say about someone who’s just died. But he soon realized they meant it. His father was a good man.

He then set out to discover more about the father he had always admired and looked up to.

His book is called “A Good Man.”

Listen to Mark Shriver

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Buzz Bissinger “Father’s Day”

May 31st, 2012

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Pulitzer Prize-winning author and journalist Buzz Bissinger is the father of twin sons, Gerry and Zach. They were born three minutes apart, but during those three critical minutes, Zach’s brain was starved of oxygen and was permanently damaged.

But Bissinger’s book “Father’s Day” is neither a sad nor sappy account of being the father of a mentally impaired child.

It’s about a father trying to connect with a son who is now an adult with the mental capacity of a child, and finding a man to admire.

Buzz  BissingerBissinger

The book chronicles a cross-country road trip Buzz and Zach took a couple of years ago…

Listen to Buzz Bissinger

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What Brad Meltzer Is Most Proud of Writing

March 18th, 2011

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Brad Meltzer‘s father died a couple of weeks ago.

My first memory of my father is him coming home from work when I was little. He’d pick me up and put me on the top of the refrigerator, my little feet dangling over the freezer door. And in that moment, I realize he had the two things he loved most in life together in the exact same space: his family and food.

That’s from the eulogy that Brad wrote and delivered at Stewie Meltzer’s funeral. Brad calls it “Fighting the Lightning: A Eulogy for Stewart Meltzer,” and said on his Facebook page, “This may be the thing I’m most proud of writing.”

Continue to the interview > > >

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