Aric Davis “The Fort”

June 26th, 2013

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Aric  DavisDavis

In the dog days of summer one year in the late ’80s, three 12-year-old boys are witness to a horrifying sight….

From their treehouse fort in the woods, the boys see a man holding a gun to a teenage girl’s back.

Aric  Davis

But when they go to their parents, and the police, the boys find that no one is ready to believe them.

In Aric Davis‘s thriller ‘The Fort,” the boys know evil lives in their midst. And a growing sense of honor and urgency forces them to take action – to find the missing girl, to protect themselves, to stand guard for the last long days of summer.

Continue to the interview > > >

facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Green Blue University online blog for writing good book report.

North Bend Library - free homework help online.


Mark Updegrove “Indomitable Will”

April 26th, 2012

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Mark  UpdegroveUpdegrove

To younger Americans, Lyndon Johnson is almost the “invisible” president, a chief executive who had neither the smooth charisma of John F. Kennedy nor the foreign policy brilliance of Richard Nixon.

Mark  Updegrove

But Mark Updegrove would take exception to the notion of LBJ as a footnote. Updegrove is director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, and author of the book “Indomitable Will.” The unique structure of the book blends recollections of LBJ by those who knew him, worked with him, covered him, supported him or fought him. Only when they are taken together does a clear picture of the multi-faceted Lyndon Johnson begin to emerge.

Listen to Mark Updegrove

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Don’t see a player here? Click on this link to listen, or right click and “Save As” to download.


facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


S. Brian Willson “Blood on the Tracks”

December 14th, 2011

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

S. Brian Willson returned from a tour in Vietnam in 1970 to become a radical, nonviolent peace protester and pacifist. In the years that followed, he became a lawyer and fought social injustice and a government he believes to be unjust.

S. Brian Willson

A devotion to nonviolent struggle is what led Willson, in 1987, to stage a protest in which he lay down on railroad tracks in the path of a government munitions train. The train ran over him and it cost Willson both legs. Now, after all these years, Willson finally tells his story in a memoir he calls “Blood on the Tracks.”

S. Brian WillsonWillson

Listen to S. Brian Willson

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Don’t see a player here? Click on this link to listen, or right click and “Save As” to download.


facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Karl Marlantes “What It Is Like to Go to War”

September 21st, 2011

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Karl  MarlantesMarlantes

In his 2010 bestselling debut novel “Matterhorn” highly decorated Vietnam veteran Karl Marlantes wrote what Publishers Weekly called a “dense, vivid narrative” of the Vietnam war.

Karl  Marlantes

But Marlantes had written another book, too, an equally powerful story of Vietnam – but this one, nonfiction. It was his effort to define and understand the change in a warrior’s psyche once they’ve taken other human lives, and how that change makes coming home so difficult.Karl Marlantes calls his new book “What It Is Like To Go To War.”

Listen to Karl Marlantes

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Don’t see a player here? Click on this link to listen, or right click and “Save As” to download.


facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Johanna Skibsrud “The Sentimentalists”

May 23rd, 2011

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Johanna  Skibsrud

A young woman’s dauntless search for the truth about her dying father’s life is at the center of the debut novel by Johanna Skibsrud, “The Sentimentalists,” winner of Canada’s prestigious Giller Prize in 2010.

Johanna  SkibsrudSkibsrud

Whatever changed Napoleon Haskell, it happeened when he was in Vietnam a lifetime ago. Now as he’s slipping further into senility the story is slipping away with him, unless his daughter can capture it first. Giller Prize jurors praised “The Sentimentalists,” saying Skibsrud’s writing is “trip-wire taut as the exploration of guilt, family and duty unfolds.”

Listen to Johanna Skibsrud

Don’t see a player here? Click on this link to listen, or right click and “Save As” to download.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Check Page Rank