Caroline de Margerie “American Lady”

December 28th, 2012

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Caroline  de Margeriede Margerie

For four decades, Susan Mary Alsop reigned over Georgetown society in the nation’s capital. The Alsop home was the gathering place for everyone of importance in Washington. Henry Kissinger once famously remarked that more agreements were concluded in her living room than in the White House.

Now this American aristocrat, and unofficial American diplomat, is the subject of a new biography by Caroline de Margerie called “American Lady.”

Caroline de Margerie

What was it about Susan Mary Alsop that made her such an influential grande dame? How did she come to be known as “the second lady of Camelot”?

And how would she regard today’s Washington, where polite conversation between political opponents has fallen out of favor?

Continue to the interview > > >

facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Green Blue University online blog for writing good book report.

North Bend Library - free homework help online.


Susan Richards Shreve “You Are the Love of My Life”

October 26th, 2012

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Susan Richards Shreve

A single mother and her two kids move from New York to Washington, D.C. in 1973, to try and engineer a fresh start. But in Susan Richards Shreve‘s novel “You Are the Love of My Life” that goal seems elusive.

Susan Richards ShreveShreve

Lucy Painter has left the married-to-someone-else father of her children to live in a tightly-knit Washington neighborhood — in the house where she grew up, and where she discovered her father’s suicide.

It develops that Lucy’s life is full of secrets. Her children know nothing of her father’s death, or the identity of their own father.
Continue to the interview > > >

facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


At The 2011 National Book Festival

September 30th, 2011

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Two days, over 100 authors, some 200,000 visitors. That was the 2011 National Book Festival in Washington, D.C., the eleventh annual celebration of the book and author originally launched by former librarian Laura Bush.

2011 National Book Festival

Spread over two days for the first time, the Festival also featured new pavilions, including “Let’s Read America” and one devoted to graphic novels.

Part of what I like best about the National Book Festival is the unique opportunity it presents to do lots of quick interviews in a very short period of time with a virtual all-star literary team.

Listen to our report from the 2011 National Book Festival

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Don’t see a player here? Click on this link to listen, or right click and “Save As” to download.

After the jump, listen to our Eye on Books “drive-by” interviews at the 2011 National Book Festival, and see our photo gallery!

 

Continue to the interview > > >

facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Frances and Ginger Park “Chocolate Chocolate”

July 1st, 2011

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

Frances and Ginger  Park

Three decades ago sisters Frances and Ginger Park lost their father to a sudden and premature death. Comforting themselves with chocolate while trying to think of a business they could start — and work in together — the sisters had an epiphany. A chocolate-drenched epiphany, and the resulting business, which they opened in downtown Washington, D.C. in 1984, was a boutique store called Chocolate Chocolate.

Frances and Ginger  ParkPark

Now, more than 27 years later, the Park sisters and their store are well-known and much-beloved in the nation’s capital, not just for theie decadently-delicious chocolate but for the sense of family they have built among their staff and customers.

Now Ginger and Frances Park have written a memoir, a confection for the soul, as it were, called — appropriately enough — “Chocolate Chocolate.”

Listen to Frances and Ginger Park

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Don’t see a player here? Click on this link to listen, or right click and “Save As” to download.


facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Jennifer Gilmore “Something Red”

April 18th, 2010

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather

It’s 1979 in Washington, DC, and the Goldstein family is trying to change with the times, in Jennifer Gilmore‘s second novel, “Something Red.” Parents Dennis and Sharon are coming to terms with the realization that it’s not the ’60s anymore, while college-freshman son Benjamin and 16-year-old daughter Vanessa are struggling with their own shifting roles.

Jennifer  GilmoreGilmore

Listen to Jennifer Gilmore

Don’t see a player here? Click on this link to listen, or right click and “Save As” to download.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssby feather


Check Page Rank